How Much Money Can You Make Streaming Poker on Twitch?

1 week ago
07:31
09 May

A wave of poker streaming has swept up Twitch. Initially, Twitch started as a video game streaming network, but it has now grown to include a wide range of other types of content.

In recent years, several poker professionals have gone into Twitch streaming. Thousands of poker players use Twitch TV, and online casinos regularly broadcast and earn cash from their live feeds. Some of these poker streamers have a large fan following, and online poker companies like PokerStars and ACR contract these Twitch streamers as brand ambassadors.

Poker enthusiasts all around the globe often wonder how much money a regular Twitch poker streamer earns and how much the top poker streamers make. Streamers usually keep this data private since they do not want to reveal their earnings.

Subscription revenue is the most apparent method for a Twitch TV streamer to earn money. If you subscribe for $2.99, $5.99, or even $19.99 to promote your favorite streamer, they will make 50% of the income. However, Twitch TV partners may take home more than the standard offer.

Rumors were spreading that hackers had seized massive amounts of Twitch's data. Twitch subsequently acknowledged the breach when cybercriminals took its source code and over 125GB of compressed text file data, eventually leaked on the website 4chan.

As a result of the cyberattack, the hackers revealed the earnings of all streamers. Lex Veldhuis tops the field in poker, getting paid more than $294,000. The Dutch poker streamer is an ambassador for PokerStars. However, he will be unable to live stream for the time being since Dutch authorities forced PokerStars to exit the Netherlands on October 1st, when the country established its authorized online gambling industry.

Twitch streamer Brian Davis, who goes by the moniker True Geordie, was the second-highest-paid poker streamer, earning $235,000. Geordie not only streams poker games, but he also broadcasts other content.

Ben Spragg, who goes by the streamer moniker Spraggy, is in third place with $128,000 in earnings. Compared to these three streamers, the remainder of the poker Twitch channels do not do quite well, with their revenues falling below $100,000.

Several names on the list will pique the curiosity of the global poker community, such as Matt Staples, who received $84,000, and his brother Jaime Staples, who received $59,000. Jeff Gross earned about $40,000, while Arlie Shaban made nearly $35,000.



Affiliate Marketing

Aside from Twitch revenue sharing, poker affiliate networks are an excellent way to supplement your income.

If you are a poker streamer, you could also consider marketing digital wallets like Skrill and Neteller. As an affiliate, you may upgrade your referrals to Skrill and Neteller VIP, significantly simplifying the sign-up process. Paynura's affiliate network offers the most dependable e-wallet affiliate program available, complete with comprehensive statistics that allow you to monitor your earnings from each referral.

The best streamers will have a large subscriber base, which means they might make several thousand dollars per month. Mainly from their subscriptions, especially if they can convince their viewers to upgrade to a higher membership level or negotiate a better deal with Twitch.

The cornerstone of poker streaming is partnering with well-known poker sites like PokerStars or ACR to sponsor you. These contracts often begin in the mid-thousands to hundreds of thousands of dollars in total annual income (including all benefits) and soon increase into the low six figures, based on the player's prominence and the site they contract.

Overall, a great streamer may earn thousands of dollars per month from their broadcast, but in order to keep their subscriber base, they must continue to produce quality content.


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Clinton Jacob Machoka, a full time online poker player and part time freelancer. A car enthusiast and a huge fan of RnB music.Read more

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